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The subject of this article appeared in Unreal Tournament 2004.

Onslaught is a vehicle-based gametype first appearing in Unreal Tournament 2004 and developed by Psyonix.

Overview[]

"Onslaught is a large scale, team and vehicle based game mode in which players battle for control of huge exterior settings. Since these settings are so large one naturally needs a way to traverse these distances, hence there are a variety of vehicles that can be used in Onslaught. These vehicles are built to not only move but also destroy your foes.

Each team has their own vehicles and you cannot steal your foes vehicles unless they unlock them by first getting into them. If your enemy jumps into a tank and then leaps out to pick up ammo you can then hijack it and turn the tables on him!

The main objective in any Onslaught game is to destroy your enemies' "Power Core." This critical point is usually located in the heart of your opponent's base. Sounds simple, right? Here's the catch - a Power Core cannot be damaged unless your team has a link to it. How do you acquire a link? By controlling the smaller "Power Nodes" on the map and making a connection from your own Power Core to your opponents. Power Nodes begin as neutral points in the level and once they're touched they begin to build for your team. At this point the opposing team can attack and try to destroy the Node as it is being constructed. If they manage to destroy it it will go neutral again and can be re-claimed by either team. If they fail to destroy it the Node will be built for your own team and a link will be made to your own Power Core.

The next step in an Onslaught map involves proceeding to the next Node. Since the enemies Power Core can only be damaged if there is a link to your own Core you'll have to take over a number of Nodes in order to make this connection. It is extremely important to note that you can ONLY take over a Node if you control an adjacent Node. You must progress across the map, taking over point by point, in order to stage an assault on your enemies' Core. Since death comes quick in the Tournament it is also good to know that once your team controls a Node you can then choose to respawn at it. This allows a team to have an advancing presence on any given map."

The objective of the gametype is to capture a series of power nodes connecting your base to your opponents' base, and to destroy their power core.

The key elements in an Onslaught game are the Power Cores, Power Nodes, and Power Links. Also frequently present in Onslaught games but not unique to the gametype are vehicles, turrets, and three additional weapons: the AVRiL, Grenade Launcher, and Mine Layer.

In Onslaught, each team has one Power Core, usually located somewhere within the team's base. The core can lose health over the course of the game either by being attacked by the enemy team, or through draining, which takes place during overtime. Power cores can only be attacked when a power node linked to the power core is controlled by the enemy team. Power cores cannot be healed by any means, so it is vital that they are protected from enemy attack at all times. The amount of health of a Power Core can be set up by the mapper; in all official ONS maps, the Power Core has 5000 Health, except for ONS-Dria, which has 9000.

Next up are the Power Nodes and Power Links. Each map has one or more power nodes connected to the power cores by means of a power link. At the start of the game, all nodes are neutral--that is, not controlled by either team. To take control of a neutral power node, or attack an enemy node, the power node must be linked to either your power core, or a power node controlled by your team. Unlike power cores, power nodes may be healed, and building of a power node can be expedited, by firing at the node with the Link Gun alternate fire. Most nodes have 2000 Health, although like Power Cores above, this is not a definitive, ironclad rule.

Warfare is an evolved form of the gametype.

Scoring[]

The scoring rules for Onslaught are the following:

  • 2 points for a core destruction in regular time
  • 1 point for a core destruction in overtime

Configurable options[]

Unreal Tournament 2004[]

Item Type Default Description
Bots
Number of Bots Integer 0 Specify the number of bots that should join your match.
Bot Mode List Use Map Defaults Specify how the number of bots in the match is determined.
Bots Balance Teams Boolean Yes Bots will join or change teams to make sure they are even.
Bot Skill List Average Set the skill of your bot opponents.
Game
Weapons Stay Boolean Yes When enabled, weapons will always be available for pickup.
Goal Score Integer 3 The game ends when someone reaches this score.
Time Limit Integer 20 The game ends after this many minutes of play.
Enable Player Highlighting Boolean No At a distance, players have a team colored glow.
Random Link Setup After Reset Boolean No After a reset, a new link setup will be chosen at random.
Teams Swap Sides After Reset Boolean Yes After a reset, teams will switch sides so they are defending the PowerCore they were previously attacking.
Core Drain in Overtime Integer 20 In overtime, PowerCores lose a maximum of this much health every second.
Delay at End of Game Float 4.000000 How long to wait after the match ends before switching to the next map.
Friendly Fire Scale Float 0.00 Specifies how much damage players from the same team can do to each other.
Spawn Protection Time Float 3.00 Specifies how long players are invulnerable after they spawn (unless they fire).
Rules
Allow Weapon Throwing Boolean Yes When enabled, players can throw their current weapon out.
Weapons Shake View Boolean Yes When enabled, some weapons cause view shaking while firing.
Allow Taunts Boolean Yes Enables players to use the recorded taunts.

Maplists[]

Onslaught maps for Unreal Tournament 2004
XP Bonus Maps: 
ECE Bonus Pack maps: 

Tips and tricks[]

  • Like Capture the Flag, killing means very little, the objectives are everything. This means if you aren't fighting near an important node, you aren't helping your team.[2]
  • What nodes should you be attacking? Well, there are A LOT of possibilites. The obvious node to attack would be the next in the link setup. Meaning, attack the next enemy node that isn't locked. However, you may also want to attack the enemy trying to repair or build a node that may even be locked for your team. This will slow them down, even if you can't take that node.[2]
  • The beginning is VERY important. If you are in your base loading up, you are hurting your team. You should grab the weapons in the nearest locker, grab a vehicle, then head towards a node. Now, if you are coordinating well, you should have 1 guy head for the nearest node and build it up as fast as possible while a few guys head for the middle node. The person that grabs the Manta should head for the first node, since it will get them there the fastest. The first node should be built almost the same time your team hits the next node. You can also send some people for the farther out node that is connected as well, but you don't have to rush and nab that one as fast as you need to go for the middle point (since both teams can hit it right after the first node).[2]
  • Heal your nodes! If you spawn and see your node is hurt, heal it first, then move on. So many nodes are left very weak while their team doesn't realize it.[2]
  • If you have no nodes left and your base is under attack, don't have your entire team defend... you need to take back the near node. You have no chance of winning if you can't regain that node, so be the hero and try and take it back or at least destroy it and slow them down. If you can take that node, the enemy can no longer attack your core, so it is a MUCH better option then just slowing your defeat by only defending your core.[2]
  • Defend your nodes. In some situations, defending a certain node is much more important. For instance, if your team has all the nodes and can attack the core, maybe you should stay and defend the last node instead of attacking the core like the rest of your team. If the other team is smart, they will send people to try and destroy your node, and nothing is more frustrating than attacking the core or a node and then get cut off because your team didn't hold the node connecting it.[2]
  • When healing/attacking nodes, don't do it standing still. Seems like the only way people know how to kill other is by running them over, so don't make yourself an easy target... dodge around, jump up and down, strafe back and forth, MOVE while attacking/healing a node. Keep your aim on the node while circling around it. When you are dealing with a node, you usually can't see too much else so you can get blindsided easily... make it harder on your enemy by moving around while attacking a node.[2]
  • The most common strategy in Onslaught is to rush the central node as quickly as possible and get the match down to the last node. Once it becomes a battle over the last node and your team has control of the majority of the vehicles in a map, the match is essentially over.
  • When SuperWeapons are enabled and a map has the Redeemer, this weapon is often sought after as you can destroy a node in one shot with it. However, be careful shooting this from long distances away as they can be shot down in mid air and do no damage at all. The Target Painter is also heavily used in certain maps as it can severely damage a full health node.
  • In competitive play, Onslaught plays much differently. With coordination, it is actually not hard to get back the last node and start to build up a defense on many maps. One thing that facilitates this is having more than one person using vehicles, which is something that pub play often misses out on.

Trivia[]

  • Among the files for Unreal Tournament 3 are pictures that suggest that Onslaught in its original form was considered for the game, before being turned into Warfare. The maps that ended up becoming Warfare maps actually have filenames that start with the "ONS-" prefix.

Author's notes[]

"Onslaught is a large scale, team and vehicle based game mode in which players battle for control of huge exterior settings. Since these settings are so large, one naturally needs a way to traverse these distances, hence there are a variety of vehicles that can be used in Onslaught. These vehicles are built to not only move but also destroy your foes.

Each team has their own vehicles and you cannot steal your foes vehicles unless they unlock them by first getting into them. If your enemy jumps into a tank and then leaps out to pick up ammo you can then hijack it and turn the tables on him!

The main objective in any Onslaught game is to destroy your enemies' "Power Core." This critical point is usually located in the heart of your opponent's base. Sounds simple, right? Here's the catch - a Power Core cannot be damaged unless your team has a link to it.

How do you acquire a link? By controlling the smaller "Power Nodes" on the map and making a connection from your own Power Core to your opponents. Power Nodes begin as neutral points in the level and once they're touched they begin to build for your team. At this point the opposing team can attack and try to destroy the Node as it is being constructed. If they manage to destroy it it will go neutral again and can be re-claimed by either team. If they fail to destroy it the Node will be built for your own team and a link will be made to your own Power Core.

The next step in an Onslaught map involves proceeding to the next Node. Since the enemies Power Core can only be damaged if there is a link to your own Core you'll have to take over a number of Nodes in order to make this connection. It is extremely important to note that you can ONLY take over a Node if you control an adjacent Node. You must progress across the map, taking over point by point, in order to stage an assault on your enemies' Core.

Since death comes quick in the Tournament it is also good to know that once your team controls a Node you can then choose to respawn at it. This allows a team to have an advancing presence on any given map."
Mark Rein[3]

Preview notes[]

"More importantly, though, are the new gameplay modes. Assault, the perennial fan favorite is back, and an entirely new mode called Onslaught is already in place. Here, multiple control points separate two color-coordinated bases. There are lines between each control point or "node," and capturing a node changes the line's color to that of the capturing team. Players work their way across the map in an effort to connect all the nodes and change the connecting lines to their color, eventually having a node of their color connecting to the enemy base. Once this happens, the enemy's base becomes the main target. While each node along the way can be destroyed, repaired, and taken by either team at any point, the team bases cannot be repaired at all. Destroying the enemy base is how the match is won. However, if the node linking an enemy to your base is recaptured by your team or is destroyed, then your base can no longer be attacked. It sounds a little confusing, but in reality, it's quite simple and should lead to power struggles throughout the entire map.

As you may have guessed, maps like this are quite huge, and although you can respawn at any control point your team controls, walking for a few minutes to join the battle is not the way of UT. Therefore, something new had to be added. Something faster. Something more powerful. Something like a tank. Or a dune buggy. Or a fighter. Or a bomber."
Gamespy[4]
"The onslaught game mode is, according to Mark Rein, a lot like capture the flag in most respects--except that rather than capturing an object and returning it to your own base, you'll simply be attempting to destroy the object. There will be at least nine levels designed specifically for onslaught in UT2004, and if the level we were shown is an indication of what to expect, they'll be huge. The expansive exterior level we saw was more than a little reminiscent of one of Halo's multiplayer levels, only a lot bigger and with more-impressive base structures at either end. In addition to turret defenses, each base contained a number of parked vehicles that the guys from Epic couldn't wait to show off. First up was a skimmer that, like many of the things in onslaught, brought Halo multiplayer to mind. A one-man craft, the skimmer is a high-speed, lightly armored hovering vehicle that is complemented by a second, as-yet-unnamed flying attack craft that purportedly handles in much the same way as a helicopter. Other vehicles that we got to see in action included a tank, a three-man buggy with a fixed gun position in the back, and a one-man buggy in which you'll be able to shoot in any direction while driving."
Gamespot[5]
"The biggest portion of the new content is two game modes. One is Onslaught and essentially is UT with drivable vehicles. Polge showed us a few of the new Onslaught maps and they are huge with lots of outdoor terrain. The vehicles range from small one man hovercraft and jeeps to a three man jeep to a big and powerful tank. We also saw playable turrets mounted into the bases of the Onslaught maps. Two new hand held weapons were also seen; a grenade launcher that fires “sticky bombs” on targets and a spider bomb that moves toward their intended victim."
HomeLan Fed[6]


Gallery[]

External links and references[]

  1. Unreal Tournament 2004 Trip Report @ PU
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Squirrelinabox (February 13, 2004). "Onslaught tips and tricks". Unreal Playground. Archived from the original on July 27, 2013. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  3. Rein, Mark (July 24, 2003). "Descriptions of UT2004's Assault and Onslaught Game Types". Atari Forums. Archived from the original on March 13, 2005. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  4. Rice, Kevin (August 7, 2003). "Unreal Tournament 2004 (PC) Preview". Gamespy. Archived from the original on December 3, 2003. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  5. Calvert, Justin (May 14, 2003). "Unreal Tournament 2004 Impressions". Gamespot. Archived from the original on January 16, 2005. Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  6. Callaham, John (May 16, 2003). "Unreal Tournament 2004 Impressions". HomeLan Fed. Archived from the original on February 7, 2005. Retrieved July 11, 2020.

See also[]

Gametypes for Unreal Tournament 2004
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